Fike Video Analytics Flame, Smoke and Intrusion Detection System

Fike Video Analytics Flame, Smoke and Intrusion Detection System

Description

Fike Video is a turnkey video smoke detection solution. The state-of-the-art, camera-based Fike Video Analytics smoke detection system, visually detects the presence of flame or smoke at its source, independent of airflow in the area. Fike Video Analytics represents a critical advantage for early warning fire detection, especially for challenging environments and open area venues.

Fike video analytics IP Smoke Detection Camera

The Fike Video Analytics IP camera combines the enhanced resolution and picture clarity of a standard network camera with built-in flame, smoke and motion detector capabilities. The FM-approved technology detects:

  • Presence of flames within the field of view of the camera
  • Reflected fire light when flames are obstructed
  • Presence of pluming smoke clouds and ambient smoke
  • Unauthorized Intrusion

FSM-IP Network Video Recorder

A scalable, network video recorder with video management software, each FSM-IP is designed to support up to 32 Fike Video Analytics network, flame detecting cameras:

  • Constantly records video streams onto internal hard disk
  • Customizable storage space to meet application needs
  • Provides monitoring of live videos
  • Maintains an event log for all alarm conditions
  • Dispatches alarms and videos to remote locations
  • Network management interface for configuration and maintenance

 

fike video management software Flame, Smoke and Intrusion Detection Monitoring

Fike Video Management Software is a state-of-the-art monitoring, investigative and administrative tool designed to seamlessly access multiple FSM-servers. Fike Video Management Software combines physical security with early warning flame and smoke detection:

  • Access multiple FSM-IP at a time
  • Integrates building, site and floor plans, as well as 3rd-party systems
  • Remote monitoring over the Internet
  • Playback of archived events

 

Can existing security equipment be used to protect the facility from fire? Yes…with Fike video analytics Server

Fike Video Analytics Server is a Wintel based solution for flame, smoke and intrusion detection, designed for use in places where analog/network cameras are already in place. While the result may not be an NFPA approved solution, the Fike Video Analytics Server uses the same algorithms as the Fike Video Analytics IP™ camera and is capable of detecting and alarming on a variety of events. The Fike Video Analytics Server can process video signals from up to 16 ONVIF video streams and can be used over a single network by one Fike Video Analytics workstation for easy scalability.

  • Can process up to 16-ONVIF video feeds from IP cameras or encoders
  • Provides early warning flame, smoke and motion detection similar to the Fike Video Analytics IP camera
  • Has multiple unit scalability over the IP network
  • Provides remote monitoring over the LAN or Internet using Fike Video Management Software
  • Provides remote playback of archived events
  • Addresses the security needs of your organization
  • Requires a 1GB network to support video transmission

 

PROVEN OIL MIST DETECTION USING VIDEO ANALYTICS

Oil mist is the most common cause of marine engine room fires and, potentially, the most devastating. Oil mist or spray is caused by minor leaks in pressurized fuel lines or when fuel makes contact with a hot surface and vaporizes.

According to DN VGL statistics…

  • More than 60 percent of all marine fires are initiated by engine hot spots
  • Over 50 percent are caused by oil leakage/mist combination
  • Early detection allows fast response

New, advanced video analytic technology overcomes these limitations and has proven to be a highly reliable solution for marine applications when monitoring video from existing ONVIF compliant cameras.

Video Image Detection systems can play a dual role providing both fire protection and facility security. Fike Video Analytics Server provides a cost-effective alternative in many retro-fit and existing security applications.

Applications

  • Museums
  • Transportation
  • Aircraft hangars
  • Education
  • Manufacturing
  • Energy
  • Warehouses
  • Distribution centers
  • Maritime
Take advantage of the NEW $1 million tax benefit by investing in security and life safety measures

Take advantage of the NEW $1 million tax benefit by investing in security and life safety measures

Are you eligible for $1million in tax deductions?

Businesses have been always been able to deduct business-related equipment placed in service, but security systems did not qualify – now they do. Beginning in 2018, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act  allows qualifying businesses to deduct the full cost of new “Security and Fire Protections Systems,”up to $1 million. Prior to passage of the Act, companies had to be depreciate the system cost over a period of up to 39 years. The legislation was passed to encourage businesses that are considering capital investments in this critical area and promote industry investment.

https://www.securityindustry.org/report/guide-to-new-tax-incentives-for-security-and-fire-protection-systems/

The Security Industry Association (SIA) worked with industry groups to expand deductions under Section 179 of the IRS tax code which empowers businesses to deduct the full purchase price of qualifying equipment and/or software purchased or financed during the tax year. The revised tax code permanently expands eligibility for deductions to fire protection, alarm, and security systems along with other equipment placed in service in 2018 and beyond.

Talk to your accounting partner to understand the impact this could have on your business.

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Schools Need Carbon Monoxide Detectors. It’s Not Rocket Science.

In early March, a carbon monoxide (CO) leak coming from a basement boiler room at an elementary school in Dallas, Texas, went unchecked for an entire school day.  Students went home with splitting headaches and, in some cases, were vomiting.  Later that night the administration checked for CO, but, with the boiler presumably shut down after school hours, did not sense the gas.  Fortunately, another check occurred the following morning—during schools hours, with the boiler operating—and detected heightened levels of CO.  Students (840 total) were sent home, and five teachers went to the hospital, including two by ambulance.A quick history lesson shows us that what happened in Dallas was not an isolated incident.  Already this year, middle school students in Rochester, New York, faced high levels of CO when snow blocked a rooftop exhaust vent.  In Colorado Springs, Colorado, a malfunctioning furnace was the culprit.  And in St. Louis, Missouri, students were sent home due to CO emissions from a faulty boiler.  Last year was no different. Illinois, Massachusetts, and Utah all saw students exposed to the deadly gas.  In 2013, it was California and Missouri.  In 2012, schools in Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Utah experienced CO exposure.  All in all, there have been 45 CO exposure incidents at schools in 31 states since January 2008 (by my count).  While this number is, unfortunately, dwarfed by the rate and frequency of residential incidents over the same period, it is also true that more people (i.e., school-aged children) are exposed to a CO leak at school than in the home. It is clear that every school building housing a CO-emitting device (boilers, furnaces, and the like) needs CO detection.

Currently, five states require CO detection in their schools (CA, CT, MD, SC, and UT).  In fairness, it is possible that local ordinances exist at the county and district levels in other states.  And many schools in these and other states, I’m sure, have been proactive in installing detection even though it is not a requirement. This is commendable!  Interestingly, a spokesperson for a San Antonio school district was recently quoted as saying that, unlike homes, schools do not need CO detection because windows and doors are often left open and provide adequate ventilation; and that what happened in Dallas was an anomaly.  Parents of students in Rochester, Colorado Springs, and St. Louis might disagree.

By all accounts, parents in Dallas have raised the issue of CO detection and it sounds like a local group even donated alarms to the school.  This is a fantastic start.  But here’s what people need to know: single-station CO alarms, such as the ones you and I buy at the hardware store for our home, aren’t really meant for installation in a school.  True, those devices are better than having NO protection at all, but a higher level of protection is a CO detection system that connects to a supervised monitoring station.  This type of system is capable of alerting teachers in every classroom or other area of possible CO exposure before CO concentrations reach a dangerous level.  Administration would be notified as well, and with the precise location of the detector closest to the source.  This feature is particularly helpful since boilers and furnaces are typically kept in rooms that are unoccupied and locked, which reduces the likelihood that someone will hear a CO alarm activation coming from inside the room.

While installation standards do not require a detector in each classroom—only in those adjacent or connected via ductwork to a room with a CO source—proper installation requires extensive planning and effort, which is why NEMA encourages state legislators to provide support, instead of leaving this on the shoulders of local and school officials.  School-aged children, as we all know, are not just little adults.  Their bodies are much more susceptible to CO exposure and can sustain lasting damage even before an adult feels any symptoms at all. So why risk a tragedy when the steps are so clear to prevent it?  It’s not rocket science.

Starting in 2019, Rhode Island now requires Carbon Monoxide detection systems in all RI Schools.  Contact AAA Alarms and Fire Protection for a free estimate.

City of Cranston, RI implementing new Fire Alarm Radio Master Box system.  All Gamewell boxes need updating!

City of Cranston, RI implementing new Fire Alarm Radio Master Box system. All Gamewell boxes need updating!

The City of Cranston has implemented a new Fire Alarm monitoring network of new technology Radio based Master Boxes to replace the old “hard line” turn of the century Gamewell Boxes.   This conversion will allow for more detailed information for specific zones, troubles and alarms to be more effectively and more reliably communicated to the nearest Fire Station located in the city of Cranston.   This conversion is possible with utilizing your existing fire alarm system, but will need radio box purchase and installation of antennas and equipment.  This equipment utilizes a mesh network radio transponder system whereby each facility with a box acts as a repeater for other facilities to build a network of communications for fire alarm signals only.

Smoke Alarms and Carbon Monoxide Alarms in One and Two Family Dwellings


What are the current fire code requirements for one and two family home smoke and carbon monoxide inspections under the newly adopted Fire Code effective January 1, 2013 ?

Determination of the Board:

The following guidelines shall be utilized in the smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detection inspections of one and two family homes:

Homes built in 1976 or prior: Smoke Alarms shall be installed outside sleeping areas and on each level of the dwelling unit(s) (including basements). Smoke Alarms shall be permitted to be battery operated. Smoke Alarms are not required to be interconnected. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be installed outside sleeping areas. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be permitted to be battery operated. Carbon Monoxide Detectors are not required to be interconnected.

Homes built on and after January 1, 1977 through December 31, 2001: Smoke Alarms shall be installed outside sleeping areas and on each level of the dwelling unit(s) (including basements). Smoke Alarms shall be hard-wired with battery backup. Smoke Alarms shall be required to be interconnected. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be installed outside sleeping areas. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be permitted to be battery operated. Carbon Monoxide Detectors are not required to be interconnected.

Homes built on and after January 1, 2002 through February 19, 2004: Smoke Alarms shall be installed outside sleeping areas and on each level of the dwelling unit(s) (including basements). Smoke Alarms shall be hard-wired with battery backup. Smoke Alarms shall be required to be interconnected. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be installed outside sleeping areas. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be hard-wired with battery backup. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be required to be interconnected.

Homes built on and after February 20, 2004 through December 31, 2012: Smoke Alarms shall be installed inside each bedroom, outside sleeping areas and on each level of the dwelling unit(s) (including basements) (In accordance with NFPA 72 (2002 Edition). Smoke Alarms shall be hard-wired with battery backup. Smoke Alarms shall be required to be interconnected. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be installed outside each sleeping area and on each level of the dwelling unit including basements. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be hard-wired with battery backup. Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be required to be interconnected.

Homes built on and after January 1, 2013: Smoke alarms shall be installed in accordance with NFPA 72 (2010 Edition). Carbon Monoxide Detectors shall be installed in accordance with NFPA 720 (2012 Edition). Where the above provisions require both smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detections, combination devices shall be permitted and deemed to be acceptable. Where smoke alarms are required, household fire alarm systems, in accordance with NFPA 72 (2010 Edition), shall be permitted.
RI Governor signs law to require carbon monoxide detectors in schools 2019

RI Governor signs law to require carbon monoxide detectors in schools 2019

Let AAA Alarms help your school or department comply with the new Rhode Island Law mandating that your school facilities have professionally installed carbon monoxide detectors. AAA offers fully addressable and wireless carbon monoxide detectors to aid with installation, along with full testing, maintenance and monitoring of these systems. Call today for a free estimate and speak to one of our experts.

Examples of Carbon Monoxide Sources in Schools:

1)Fuel fired heating systems like boilers, indoor heating/ventilation units, outdoor rooftop units, outdoor ground units, and makeup air units.

2)Multi-zone gas fired systems serving muliple rooms require devices in each room or within ductwork within the 20 foot requirement.

3)Interior emergency generators

4)Fuel fire kitchen equipment like ranges, ovens, steamers and dishwashers.

5)Fuel fired domestic water heaters

6)Lab and shop equipment outlets such as gas outlets in science rooms, torches in welding labs, gas fired kilns, stationary or portable engines in an auto shop, gas powered tools in any wood/work shops.

7)Maintenance operations such as propane powered floor machines.

8)Any fuel burning piece of equipment.

July 2018–STATE HOUSE — Gov. Gina Raimondo has signed legislation introduced by Rep. Joseph M. McNamara (D-Dist. 19, Warwick, Cranston) and Sen. Joshua Miller (D-Dist. 28, Cranston, Providence) that effectively requires the installation of carbon monoxide detectors in all schools. 

The law (2018-H 7041A, 2018-S 2179A) requires all school buildings where students are in attendance to have carbon monoxide detectors installed and maintained. The act also authorizes the Fire Safety Code Board of Appeal and Review to promulgate rules and regulations to enforce the provisions of the requirement.

Carbon monoxide is a gas that cannot be seen, smelled or tasted, and can be fatal when breathed. The symptoms that occur with carbon monoxide poisoning, such as a headache, can be similar to those of common illnesses. These similarities often lead to an incorrect diagnosis, such as flu, allergies, migraine headache or stroke.

The issue was brought to the attention of Representative McNamara by a Cranston woman, whose daughter was diagnosed with carbon monoxide poisoning that she believes her daughter suffered at school.

“The fact that the school administration building has carbon monoxide detectors, but the schools that are filled with children do not is appalling to me,” said Pauline Belal, who testified in favor of the bill at a meeting of the House Health, Education and Welfare Committee.

LAW: Effective January 1,2019, all school buildings where students are in attendance for any portion of the day shall be required to have carbon monoxide detectors installed and maintained therein, in accordance with the applicable provisions of the National Fire Protection Association (“‘NFPA”) Code and the state fire safety code (‘”state code”), chapter 28.1 of title 23. The fire safety code board of appeal and review (the “board”) established pursuant to chapter 28.3 of title 23 shall have authority to promulgate rules and regulations necessary to enforce the provisions of this section. Provided, in the event the state fire marshal determines that neither the NFPA code nor the state code have provisions in place to govern such installation, then the state fire marshal may use the provisions of NFPA Code 1/NFPA 101, 2015 editions, NFPA Code 720, 2012 edition, the state fire code, and any additional requirements provided under those codes for licensed nursery or day care services, as guidance in the installation of carbon monoxide detectors in schools, until such time as the board promulgates applicable rules and regulations.